Education through Ecological Restoration – Department of Planning and Landscape Architecture

Spencer Series Webinar Resources

Culturally Responsive Research Relationships

10/12/2020 (Indigenous Peoples’ Day)

This Earth Partnership – Indigenous Arts and Sciences webinar was facilitated by Dr. Nicole Bowman and EP staff, and made possible by funding from the Spencer Foundation. Dr. Bowman (Lunaape/Mohican), a Scientist and Evaluator from the WI Evaluation Consortium (wec.wceruw.org/index.html) within the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, is an internationally-acclaimed culturally responsive evaluation expert. By working “with” people and not “on” them Dr. Bowman is known as a responsive and effective multi-jurisdictional, systems, and government subject matter expert where Tribal and non-Tribal agencies partner to improve outcomes, capacities, and competencies for more effective, responsive, and impactful programming.

A link to a PDF version of the 10/12/20 presentation file can be viewed here.

See below for readings and resources curated by Dr. Bowman specifically to help non-Indigenous academics develop early skills in developing and nurturing positive, respectful relationships with Indigenous communities.

Culturally Responsive and Indigenous Evaluation Bibliography and Resource List (Bowman, 2020)

Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation: A Practical Approach for Evaluating Indigenous Projects in Tribal Reservation Contexts (Bowman & Dodge-Francis, 2015)

Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation and Tribal Governments: Understanding the Relationship (Bowman & Dodge-Francis, 2018)

Earth Partnership Indigenous Arts and Sciences: Connecting STEM to Native Science (Bauer-Armstrong & Cloud)

Increasing Cultural Competence in Support of Indigenous-Led Evaluation: A Necessary Step toward Indigenous-Led Evaluation (Wehipeihana, 2019)

Kūlana Noi’i (University of Hawai’i Research Standards)

Looking Backward but Moving Forward: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Indigenous Evaluation (Bowman, 2018)

Nation to Nation Conceptual Model (Bowman)

Nation to Nation Evaluation: Governance, Tribal Sovereignty, and Systems Thinking through Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluations (Bowman, 2019)

Nation to Nation in Evaluation: Utilizing an Indigenous Evaluation Model to Frame Systems and Government Evaluations (Bowman, 2020)

Research Regulation (NCAI Policy Research Center)

“Scientific” Research and Evaluation Poem

Tribal IRBs: A Framework for Understanding Research Oversight in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities (Around Him et al.)

Tribal Nations and the United States: An Introduction (NCAI)

Walk Softly and Listen Carefully: Building Research Relationships with Tribal Communities (NCAI)

White Privilege and the Decolonization Work Needed in Evaluation to Support Indigenous Sovereignty and Self-Determination (McKegg, K., 2019)

 

Members of the Ho-Chunk Nation are pictured during a heritage marker dedication ceremony for the "Our Shared Future" plaque on Bascom Hill at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on June 18, 2019. The “Our Shared Future” plaque makes clear that the university occupies ancestral Ho-Chunk land and will serve to educate the campus community members and campus visitors. (Photo by Bryce Richter /UW-Madison)
A "Our Shared Future" plaque is pictured on Bascom Hill at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on June 18, 2019. The “Our Shared Future” marker makes clear that the university occupies ancestral Ho-Chunk land and will serve to educate the campus community members and campus visitors. (Photo by Bryce Richter /UW-Madison)
A bronze statue, titled The Badger, created by late Ho-Chunk artist Harry Whitehorse sits across from Camp Randall Stadium and the UW Field House at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on Sept. 17, 2019. (Photo by Bryce Richter /UW-Madison)

Learn more about Earth Partnership – Indigenous Arts and Sciences

 

This project is made possible by funding from the Spencer Foundation

Spencer Foundation logo

Earth Partnership IAS is also supported by the National Science Foundation and the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies (UW-Madison).